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The Mogford Prize for Food & Drink Writing

An introduction from Jeremy Mogford:

I am lucky enough to have enjoyed a lifetime in the hospitality industry with my involvement with Browns Restaurants, Rules in London and my current Oxford collection of the Old Bank Hotel and Quod, the Old Parsonage and Gee’s.

The city of Oxford has been an historical centre for literary excellence, so it seemed the perfect idea to create and sponsor an annual short story prize which specifically included the subjects of food and/or drink within the plot.

The first prize of £7,500 was awarded in 2013 and the prize has steadily grown in popularity, attracting over 450 entries in 2015 and over 600 in 2016, with this year’s prize being increased to £10,000.

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Mogford Short Story Prize 2017
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Click Here To Submit You Short Story >

THE 2017 PRIZE

From 7th November 2016 we will be inviting entries for the fifth annual prize which will be awarded during the FT Weekend Oxford Literary Festival on 29th March 2017. The winning prize for 2017 has been increased to £10,000, with a £10 entry fee.

We’re very excited to announce that two of our judges this year will be famous English author Philip Pullman, and British food writer and television presenter Mary Berry.

Food and Drink must be at the heart of the tale. The story could, for instance, be fiction or fact about a chance meeting over a drink, a life-changing conversation over dinner, or a relationship explored through food and drink. It could be crime or intrigue; in fact any subject as long as it involves food and/or drink in some way.

Applicants are invited from anywhere in the world. They can be published or unpublished authors, but the entry itself must be previously unpublished. The story is to be up to 2,500 words and must be written in English.

Please read the 2017 Mogford Prize terms and conditions before entering.

Click here to submit you short story.

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